Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA)

Last Updated: June 29, 2018

Definition - What does Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) mean?

The Controlled Drugs and Substances Act is a federal drug law in Canada that was passed in 1996. It divides illicit drugs into various classifications, and mandates the jail terms for individuals who engage in the possession, trafficking, and production of those drugs.

WorkplaceTesting explains Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA)

The Controlled Drugs and Substances Act is a Canadian law that divides illicit drugs into classifications known as schedules. Schedule I drugs are opiates, which include hydrocodone, opium, and codeine. Schedule II drugs includes cannabis and any products derived from cannabis. Schedule III drugs are hallucinogens, which include DMT, LSD, and mescaline. Schedule IV drugs are barbiturates, which include phenobarbital, clonazepam, diazepam, and estazolam. Further schedules are divided into the precursors of each of these drug types. The law mandates jail times for the possession, trafficking, and production of these drugs depending upon which schedule the drug in question falls under.

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