Circumduction

Last Updated: May 22, 2018

Definition - What does Circumduction mean?

Circumduction relates to a particular body part, or section of parts, that is able to move in a circular pattern, exercising rotational motions that is common among ball-and-socket, condyloid, and saddle joints. The hips, shoulders, fingers, and wrists are capable of executing these circular, or conical, movements, which work interdependently by means of abduction, adduction, flexion, and extension.

As with any movement, there is a risk of injury to workers. Workers in positions that require this type of movement frequently should be trained in wasy to mitigate the risk of injury.

WorkplaceTesting explains Circumduction

Circumduction pertains to a specific joint that rotates about its axis, typically allowing the articulating extremity to complete a fluid motion that resembles a full circle at the farthest end of the rotating limb. Ball-and-socket joints have a unique configuration in which a convex surface, or rounded end, fits into a concave surface, or a bony cavity, such as the hip and shoulder joints permitting the entire member to revolve within a spatial distance of three hundred-and-sixty degrees according to the joint’s axial pivot. Circumduction involves multiple active muscles performing different synchronous ranges of motion including abduction, adduction, flexion, and extension.

As with most movements, repetition of this type of movement, especially under load, increases the chance of injury in the workplace. Ergonomics programs, worker education, and good safety procedures can reduce or limit the chances of worker injury in positions that require this type of movement frequently.

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