Stressor

Definition - What does Stressor mean?

A stressor is a particular circumstance, requirement, or situation that can induce stress, a biochemical change in behavioral, physiological, and/or psychological health. Stress is the body’s automatic response to workplace factors that often consist of rigorous job demands and expectations from employees. Individuals can experience stressors based on variables including type of industry, relevant duties and tasks, and position level.

WorkplaceTesting explains Stressor

Career opportunities and advancement are both rewarding and stressful for many individuals. Although stressors are relatively normal aspects related to any occupation, chronic stressful conditions can lead to a wide range of emotional and/or physical disturbances including anxiety, depression, lowered morale, mood swings, and impaired cognition (i.e. difficulty concentrating). The cause of stress can often reflect several aspects of an employee's work life including management changes, revised business models, workload increase, and/or job downgrade.

Employers can impose unreasonable job expectations on the workforce with the intended goal of maximizing output. However, employees can feel burdened to meet job standards without compromising the quality of work required. As a result, stress can ensue, resulting in physiological anomalies such as hypertension (high blood pressure) and accelerated pulse, making people susceptible to pathological conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity.

Solutions are available to reduce the behavioral, physical, and/or psychological ramifications connected to stressors such as proper nutrition, consistent exercise, relaxation techniques (i.e. meditation/yoga), and/or consulting a therapist. Employers are also obligated to ensure a working environment conducive to health and safety with policies covering stress management guidelines.

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