Amphetamine

Definition - What does Amphetamine mean?

An amphetamine is a type of synthetic drug that stimulates the central nervous system. Because of this stimulant affect, as well as other characteristics of the drug, it has been used for various medical treatments. Amphetamines are sometimes prescribed to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, narcolepsy, and obesity.

However, the drugs are often associated with illegal use and is one of the most commonly tested for classes in drug testing. Amphetamine is a Schedule II drug as defined by the Controlled Substance Act. Amphetamine abuse, particularly the use of methamphetamine, is a growing health care concern. The affects of methamphetamine abuse can be severe and long-lasting. Illegal forms of the drug include pills, crystals, and powders. Some names of street drugs in this class are ICE, speed, crystal meth, rock, uppers, and dexies.

WorkplaceTesting explains Amphetamine

Amphetamines were discovered in 1910 but not synthesized until 1927. The drug was at first considered safe and beneficial for use in treating a number of conditions. An early trade name for the drug was Benzedrine. Another, more powerful form of the drug was called Dexadrine. Shortly after the drugs were made available for medical use, it was recognized that they could increase concentration and performance. Benzadrine tablets were distributed to military personnel during World War II.

Unfortunately, the effect that amphetamines have on the brain makes them highly addictive. The effects of amphetamine abuse can include paleness, repetitive behaviors, teeth grinding, emotional disturbances, and irregular breathing. Long-term effects of abuse can include an impaired immune system, malnutrition, psychosis, violent behavior, and delusions. The use of prescribed amphetamines is now closely controlled.

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