Writ

Definition - What does Writ mean?

A writ is a judicial document issued by a court under federal or state jurisdiction ordering an appellate or lower court to recognize and implement a course of action in a legal matter. Writs serve as remedial alternatives in the instance that defendants appeal their case for further inquiry surrounding a discrepancy of judgment.

WorkplaceTesting explains Writ

Writs can be an effective measure in helping defendants receive justice in terms of protecting their constitutional rights against unlawful actions or practices. However, obtaining a writ can require a series of steps where legal advice from a counsellor with extensive knowledge and expertise on writs and their judicial application is beneficial. All writs embody a particular condition sanctioned by federal and/or state judicial systems, ordering involved party(s) to comply with its terms for the purpose of adjudication.

For instance, a writ of certiorari might be issued on the grounds a defendant is misrepresented by negligent counsel while, conversely, a writ of capias represents a warrant for arrest. In the workplace, criminal records are a fundamental aspect in the hiring process and, in many cases, reflect whether an applicant lands a position based on background clearance. The Department of Justice (DOJ) contains a database of arrest entries where personal facts (i.e. date of birth) and physical characteristics (i.e. fingerprints, photographs) are at the requesting party’s disposal. However, government agencies can inadvertently input false or wrong information in their system, which adversely influences people’s capacity to receive gainful employment.

Depending on state regulations, individuals not granted an appeal can file a writ of mandate ordering a government body to make necessary revisions to their records to avoid any potential bias.

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